What should I avoid while using Paraflex

Contraindications for paraflex use are listed below-

Contraindications for Paraflex Use

  1. Do not take Paraflex, if you ever manifested any allergic responses to intake of paraflex or any other medications belonging to the group of skeletal muscle relaxants, such as, methocarbamol and baclofen. In the event of an allergic response with any of these medications, check with your physician regarding your safety with intake of paraflex.
  2. Paraflex could interact with a number of other medications and can precipitate serious reactions. If you are being newly started on this medication, discuss with your physician regarding all other medications you are currently taking and their safety with it. Also, if you have been taking paraflex for long, discuss with your physician regarding your history of the medication intake, when you are being started on any new medication.
  3. Do not take paraflex along with alcohol, opioid pain medications, such as, hydrocodone and codeine, antipsychotic medications, antidepressant medications, anti-seizure medications, muscle relaxants, antihistamines, OTC cough syrups, and any other medications that carry a risk for depression of the central nervous system and the respiratory center, resulting in episodes of dizziness, confusion, difficulty breathing, and respiratory arrest. The individual influence of these medications on respirations and central nervous system can get added up, thus leading to severe respiratory depression, confusion, coma, and can even be fatal.
  4. Paraflex, especially when taken in high doses, can lead to depression of respiratory center in the brain, exacerbation of SOB, and difficulty breathing. Low oxygen levels in the body with elevated carbon-di-oxide levels can contribute to altered levels of consciousness, sedation, slow & shallow breathing, severely compromised endurance and exercise tolerance, extreme fatigue, and development of seizures. Severe cases might also lead to emergency situations, such as, respiratory arrest and can result in serious debility and death. This risk with paraflex can be even high when it is taken along with any other products and medications causing central nervous and respiratory depression, such as, alcohol, opioid pain medications, antidepressants, antianxiety medications, and sedatives. Paraflex could either be avoided for a safer alternative or used with extra caution in individuals with history of breathing issues, such as, asthma and COPD, to prevent development of any episodes of severe SOB and respiratory arrest.
  5. Paraflex use can also result in fast and pounding heartbeat. Individuals with history of cardiac arrhythmias can be at increased risk for precipitation of arrhythmic episodes with the medication use and must be increasingly watchful to report worsening symptoms of arrhythmias, such as, chest pain, low blood pressure, confusion, dizziness, increasing shortness of breath, and worsening fatigue.  Hypotension and irregular heartbeat, secondary to medication intake, can contribute to the confusion and dizziness, thus significantly increasing the risk for fall and accidents. Paraflex could best be avoided for a safer alternative or used with extra caution in individuals with history of life-threatening arrhythmias.
  6. Paraflex has some potential for addiction, especially after prolonged use and/or in individuals with history of substance/drug abuse. This makes the medication a risky drug and so, must be avoided for a safer alternative in individuals with history of drug abuse.
  7. Paraflex could be avoided for a safer alternative or used with extreme caution in individuals with history of severe head injury and brain damage. Individuals with history of head injury and brain damage can be at high risk to present with severe depression of brain and associated respiratory and cardiovascular centers with the medication leading to complications such as, coma, respiratory arrest, dangerous hypotension, and bradycardia, which can be fatal.
  8. Paraflex is mainly metabolized inside the body by the liver and is excreted out of the body in the urine by the kidneys. If liver is deficient, metabolism of the drug could be compromised, which can result in higher concentrations of the drug in the body for longer periods of time. If kidney function is deficient, elimination of the drug could be compromised, which also can result in higher concentrations of the drug in the body for longer periods of time. Either case can contribute to toxicity and consequent side-effects. So, for individuals with history of compromised hepatic and/or renal function, the medication could either be avoided for a safer alternative or used with caution, with close monitoring for symptoms of toxicity with paraflex.
  9. Paraflex can also induce hepatic dysfunction and liver toxicity, leading to fatal liver failure. Individuals can present with symptoms of liver failure, such as, jaundice with yellowing of skin and eyes, itching of skin, upper right abdominal pain, abdominal distension, nausea and vomiting, confusion and disorientation, fluid retention in the body with swelling, and compromised appetite. The medication could best be avoided for a safer alternative or used with extra caution with close watch for signs and symptoms of liver failure in individuals with history of compromised liver function.

 

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